cookery, food, Life, Nature, Witchery
Leave a Comment

Vibrancy & Vigor: An Ode to Vegetables

I currently reside in a shoebox apartment in the urban area of Austin, Texas. Though my space is a small one, I do try to keep a sensible garden. I’m not an expert gardener but slowly I have noticed my pale thumb turning increasingly green… leaving me thirstier for a bigger area to try my hand at seed and soil.

Processed with VSCO with c7 preset

“The word vegetable comes from the root that means the very opposite of immobile, passive, dull, or uneventful. Vegere means to animate, enliven, invigorate, arouse. Vegete means to grow, to be refreshing, to vivify, animate. From these roots come words such as vigil, vigilant, and vigor, with all their connotations of being wide-awake, alert, of keeping watch.

‘The understanding…was vagete, quick, and lively,” observed one critic in 1662. Ben Jonson described what he saw as desirable characteristics in woman, ‘faire, young, and vegetous.’ Such respect for the vegetable soul was not confined merely to a robust sensual life, but extended into the religious dimension.

17038896_10208135913866784_4390377948293328936_o17038877_10208135913786782_8457906175905592033_o17016087_10208135914306795_7529876894669694521_o17015799_10208135914146791_7124043663686791614_o

‘Man is righteous in his Vegetated Spectre,’ proclaimed Blake when commenting about the beliefs of the ancient Druids. Elsewhere it was insisted that ‘A vegetous faith is able to say unto a mountain, Be moved into the sea.’ The downward pull of vegetables, of the vegetable soul, has also provided exemplary images of being placed, of being grounded, of having roots.

radishIMG_4662

For example, Jung said, ‘I am fully committed to the idea that human existence should be rooted in the earth.’ He bemoaned modern culture’s lack of earth-based ancestral connections.

unnamed

As Henry Corbin put it, the past is not behind us, but beneath our feet. What better way to touch the ground than through cabbages, which the poet Robert Bly says ‘love the earth.’ The word root comes from the Indo-European root ra, meaning to derive, to grow out of. To be ‘radical’ is get back to the roots. Radish stems from the same etymological roots.”

Peter Bishop, The Greening of Psychology: The Vegetable World in Myth, Dream, and Healing

unnamed

“Plants have the ability to transmit energy. Plants draw in and transform earth and water and nutrients and light and make their bodies out of them. Plants are a manifestation of these forces being woven together, and we humans have relied on them to sustain us since the beginning of our evolution. In cultures that are close to the earth I see a recognition of the power of plants to hold and draw energy and to move it along, thereby changing in a healing way. The plant world is constantly whispering to us, if we can hear it.”

– Kathleen Harrison (“Women, Plants, and Culture,” Moonwise)

IMG_2995

IMG_2996

Micros we get from Joe’s Organics out in East Austin (check out his farm, if you live in the area)

“Many bright people are really in the dark about vegetable life. Biology teachers face kids in classrooms who may not even believe in the metamorphosis of bud to flower to fruit and seed, but rather, some continuum of pansies becoming petunias becoming chrysanthemums; that’s the only reality they witness as landscapers come to campuses and city parks and surreptitiously yank out one flower before it fades from its prime, replacing it with another. The same disconnection from natural processes may be at the heart of our country’s shift away from believing in evolution. In the past, principles of natural selection and change over time made sense to kids who’d watched it all unfold. Whether or not they knew the terms, farm families understood the processes well enough to imitate them: culling, selecting, and improving their herds and crops. For modern kids who intuitively believe in the spontaneous generation of fruits and vegetables in the produce section, trying to get their minds around the slow speciation of the plant kingdom may be a stretch.”
― Barbara Kingsolver, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life

IMG_2994

“The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum, and that as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world. ”
― Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

Processed with VSCO with c8 presetimg_2567.jpgIMG_2564

“The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway.”
― Michael Pollan

small logo

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s