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My Winter Reading List

 

Making a list and checking it twice this winter. I finally have enough time in my days to read for leisure and I plan to lap it up. I’m very lucky to live in a city that has so many great local bookshops. Yesterday I biked on over to BookPeople and picked up a few of their staff favorites (and some that just sounded too appealing to pass up.)

1.  The Box Wine Sailors
For the romantic…

“The Box Wine Sailors is not about adjusting sails to match the wind. It is about adjusting lives to match a dream. Wisely or foolishly–you get to decide–Amy and her partner seek adventure, freedom, and togetherness aboard a small sailboat on a big ocean. What makes this tale unique is that its narrator is twenty something.

The Box Wine Sailors is not about adjusting sails to match the wind. It is about adjusting lives to match a dream. Wisely or foolishly–you get to decide–Amy and her partner seek adventure, freedom, and togetherness aboard a small sailboat on a big ocean. What makes this tale unique is that its narrator is twenty something.

41pr9iw-kZL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_For millennials focused on “success” since pre-kindergarten, such abandon is rare, which is too bad because experiencing life beyond the comfort zone rewards one with an unimaginable high. In Amy’s words, ‘you don’t get to feel that–until you’ve actually done it. All the way.’ If you imagine yourself living life on the edge but consider such an adventure beyond your reach, read this book.”—Don Casey, author of This Old Boat

2.  Tales of a Female Nomad
For the traveler…

Tales of a Female Nomad is the story of Rita Golden Gelman, an ordinary woman who is living an extraordinary existence. At the age of forty-eight, on the verge of a divorce, Rita left an elegant life in L.A. to follow her dream of connecting with people in cultures all over the world. In 1986 she sold her possessions and became a nomad,

51+v2GOBgpL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_living in a Zapotec village in Mexico, sleeping with sea lions on the Galapagos Islands, and residing everywhere from thatched huts to regal palaces. She has observed orangutans in the rain forest of Borneo, visited trance healers and dens of black magic, and cooked with women on fires all over the world. Rita’s example encourages us all to dust off our dreams and rediscover the joy, the exuberance, and the hidden spirit that so many of us bury when we become adults.


3.  Wild Iris
For the Poet…

A man at work recently re-introduced me to the wonderful poet, Louise Gluck so I had to include this collection of stunningly beautiful poems on my reading list.  418BRu3Yy9L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

“Gluck encompasses the natural, human, and spiritual realms, and is bound together by the universal themes of time and mortality. With clarity and sureness of craft, Gluck’s poetry questions, explores, and finally celebrates the ordeal of being alive.” – Amazon Editorial Review


4.  Feast: Why Humans Share Food
 For the Anthropologist…

The family dinner, the client luncheon, the holiday spread-the idea of people coming together for a meal seems the most natural thing in the world. But that is certainly not the case for most other members of the animal kingdom. In Feast, archeologist Martin Jones presents both historic and modern scientific evidence to illuminate how prehistoric humans first came to share food and to trace the ways in which the human meal has shaped our cultural evolution.

51iVhxrCx+L._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_ Jones takes us on a tour of the most fascinating sites and artifacts that have been discovered, and shows us how archeologists have made many fascinating discoveries. In addition, he traces the rise of such recent phenomena as biscuits, “going out to eat,” and the Thanksgiving-themed T.V. dinner. From the earliest evidence of human consumption around half a million years ago to the era of the drive-through diner, this fascinating account unfolds the history of the human meal and its profound impact on human society.


5.  Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl 
For anyone, really…

41EPYSumZvL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_

From the guitarist of the pioneering band Sleater-Kinney, the book Kim Gordon says “everyone has been waiting for” and a New York Times Notable Book of 2015– a candid, funny, and deeply personal look at making a life–and finding yourself–in music.

Before Carrie Brownstein became a music icon, she was a young girl growing up in the Pacific Northwest just as it was becoming the setting for one the most important movements in rock history. Seeking a sense of home and identity, she would discover both while moving from spectator to creator in experiencing the power and mystery of a live performance. With Sleater-Kinney, Brownstein and her bandmates rose to prominence in the burgeoning underground feminist punk-rock movement that would define music and pop culture in the 1990s. They would be cited as “America’s best rock band” by legendary music critic Greil Marcus for their defiant, exuberant brand of punk that resisted labels and limitations, and redefined notions of gender in rock.

 

**Descriptions from Amazon.com/editorials**

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